Saltar para: Posts [1], Pesquisa e Arquivos [2]

http://cyto.blogs.sapo.pt

Espaço de publicação e discussão sobre oncologia. GBM IMMUNOTHERAPY ONCO-VIRUS ONCOLOGY CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY RADIOTHERAPY


Quarta-feira, 19.08.15

Inflammation from diets deficient in nutrients contribute to weight despite intake of macronutrients

 

Inflammation from diets deficient in nutrients contribute to weight despite intake of macronutrients

Published on August 6, 2015 at 8:41 AM ·

If you are watching what you eat, working out, and still not seeing improvements in your cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar, etc., here's some hope. A new report appearing in the August 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that inflammation induced by deficiencies in vitamins and minerals might be the culprit. In this report, researchers show that - in some people - improvement results in many of the major markers of health when nutritional deficiencies are corrected. Some even lost weight without a change in their diet or levels of activity.

"It is well known that habitual consumption of poor diets means increased risk of future disease, but clearly this is not a compelling enough reason for many to improve their eating habits," said Bruce Ames, Ph.D., a senior scientist at Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, director of their Nutrition and Metabolism Center, and a professor emeritus of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of California, Berkeley. "However, a relatively easy intervention with something like the nutrient bar used in this study may help people to realize the positive impact that a diet with adequate nutrition can have in their daily lives, which may be a stronger incentive for change."

To make their Ames and colleagues undertook three clinical trials in which adults ate two nutrient bars each day for two months. Participants acted as their own controls, meaning that changes in a wide variety of biochemical (e.g., HDL-c, LDL-c, insulin) and physical (e.g., blood pressure, weight) measurements were recorded in each individual over the two-month period. People who were overweight/obese moved in a healthier metabolic direction (e.g., improved HDL, LDL, insulin, glucose, etc.), and some lost weight by just eating small, low-calorie, nutrient bars each day for two months, without any additional requirements.

"If being healthy was as simple as 'losing weight' or 'keeping thin,' our ancient ancestors who lived in times of extreme food scarcity might still be with us today," said Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal. "This report shows that what you eat is as important, if not more, than how much you eat and how many calories you burn in the gym."

Source:

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 11:56

Terça-feira, 21.07.15

Novel cancer drug candidate developed in Singapore advances into clinical trials

 

Novel cancer drug candidate developed in Singapore advances into clinical trials

Published on July 17, 2015 at 2:01 AM

A made-in-Singapore cancer drug has advanced into clinical trials, charting a milestone in Singapore's biomedical sciences initiative that will go towards improving the lives of cancer patients in Singapore, and worldwide. The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) and Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School (Duke-NUS) today announced the start of a Phase I clinical trial of novel cancer drug candidate, ETC-159. This is the first publicly-funded drug candidate discovered and developed in Singapore to advance into first-in-human trials, and will target a range of cancers. Overall, cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, accounting for 30 percent of deaths in 2013. Cancer has also resulted in 8.2 million deaths world-wide .

ETC-159 targets a number of cancers including colorectal, ovarian and pancreatic cancers which contribute to a significant proportion of Singapore's cancer burden. These cancers are linked to a group of cell signalling pathways known as Wnt signalling, that have been identified to promote cancer growth and spread when elevated or dysregulated. As ETC-159 is an inhibitor of these pathways, it could suppress cancer proliferation and prevent cancer progression.

This drug candidate therefore offers a promising novel and targeted cancer therapy that could shape future cancer therapeutic strategies.

ETC-159 was discovered and developed through a collaboration between A*STAR's Experimental Therapeutics Centre (ETC), Drug Discovery and Development (D3) unit and Duke-NUS since 2009. This was based on the discovery work of Prof David Virshup from Duke-NUS, who has continued to contribute to the development of the drug candidate.

The Phase I clinical trial will evaluate the safety and tolerability of ETC-159 in advanced solid tumours of up to 58 patients. The first patient was dosed on 18 June 2015.

Dr Benjamin Seet, Executive Director of A*STAR's Biomedical Research Council, said, "This breakthrough, which closely follows local company MerLion Pharmaceuticals' recent success in obtaining FDA approval for one of its drugs, marks an inflection point in Singapore's biomedical sciences initiative. Despite the protracted process of drug discovery and development, I am confident that we will see more locally developed drugs in the pipeline being tested and implemented."

Prof Ranga Rama Krishnan, Chairman of the National Medical Research Council (NMRC), Singapore, said, "The first dosing of a drug developed by A*STAR based on a scientific discovery by Duke-NUS researchers, is an example of the terrific and exciting progress that has been made when different entities come together to work on a common problem. This will lead to developing new treatments that can benefit patients in Singapore and beyond."

Prof Alex Matter, Chief Executive Officer of ETC and D3 said, "The discovery and subsequent development of this drug candidate marks a major breakthrough in cancer therapeutics. It also demonstrates the world-class drug discovery and development capabilities we have built up at ETC and D3, complemented by valued partners like Duke-NUS. We will continue to strengthen these capabilities and partnerships to continue developing a pipeline of promising drug candidates and advancing them into the clinic."

Prof David Virshup, inaugural Director of the Programme in Cancer and Stem Cell Biology at Duke-NUS, said, "As the drug candidate provides a targeted cancer therapy, it could potentially minimise side effects and make cancer treatments more bearable for cancer patients. This is a major milestone that was made possible by Singapore's ongoing investment in basic and translational biomedical research to address unmet medical needs. It is fitting that Singaporeans might be the first to benefit from this Singapore-developed drug."

A*STAR's ETC and Duke-NUS are the primary drivers of the discovery and development of the drug candidate. D3 joined the collaboration in 2013 to bring the project forward to achieve proof of concept in humans.

D3 has obtained ethics and regulatory approval for this trial from the SingHealth Centralised Institutional Review Board (CIRB) and the Singapore Health Sciences Authority (HSA) respectively. The first two sites for the trial are the National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) and the National University Hospital (NUH), Singapore. Trial sites in the United States will be opened as the trial progresses.

Source:

Biomedical Sciences Institutes (BMSI)

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 18:15

Terça-feira, 21.07.15

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

 

Patients' own genetically engineered immune cells show significant success against multiple myeloma

Published on July 21, 2015 at 2:37 AM 

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for certain cancers. Now this strategy, which uses patients' own immune cells, genetically engineered to target tumors, has shown significant success against multiple myeloma, a cancer of the plasma cells that is largely incurable. The results appeared in a study published online today in Nature Medicine.

Patients received an infusion of altered immune cells known as T-cells - roughly 2.4 billion of them - after undergoing a stem cell transplantation of their own stem cells. In 16 of 20 patients with advanced disease, there was a significant clinical response. The scientists found that the T-cell therapy was generally well-tolerated and that modified immune cells traveled to the bone marrow, where myeloma tumors typically are found, and showed a long-term ability to fight the tumors. Relapse was generally associated with a loss of the engineered T-cells.

"This study suggests that treatment with engineered T-cells is not only safe but of potential clinical benefit to patients with certain types of aggressive multiple myeloma," says first author Aaron P. Rapoport, MD, the Gary Jobson Professor in Medical Oncology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "Our findings provide a strong foundation for further research in the field of cellular immunotherapy for myeloma to help achieve even better results for our patients."

The trial is the first published use of genetically modified T-cells for treating patients with multiple myeloma. The approach has been used to treat leukemia as well as lymphoma, according to Dr. Rapoport, who is the Director of the Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at the University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center.

More than 77,000 people in the United States have multiple myeloma, with about 24,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Patients are treated with chemotherapy and in many cases an autologous stem cell transplant, but long-term response rates are low, and median survival is three to five years.

"The majority of patients who participated in this trial had a meaningful degree of clinical benefit," Dr. Rapoport notes. "Even patients who later relapsed after achieving a complete response to treatment or didn't have a complete response had periods of disease control that I believe they would not have otherwise experienced. Some patients are still in remission after nearly three years."

The research is a collaboration between the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Adaptimmune, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company which owns the core T-cell receptor technology and funded the study. Dr. Rapoport and co-authors Edward A. Stadtmauer, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center, and Gwendolyn K. Binder-Scholl, PhD, of Adaptimmune, contributed equally to the research. Dr. Rapoport is the study's principal investigator.

In the clinical study, patients' T-cells were engineered to express an affinity-enhanced T-cell receptor (TCR) specific for a type of tumor antigen, or protein, known as a cancer-testis antigen (CT antigen). The target CT antigens were NY-ESO-1 and LAGE-1. Up to 60 percent of advanced myelomas have been reported to express NY-ESO-1 and/or LAGE-1, which correlates to tumor proliferation and poorer outcomes. According to Adaptimmune, the trial is the first published study of lentiviral vector mediated TCR gene expression in humans.

Of the 20 patients treated, 14 (70 percent) had a near complete or complete response three months after treatment. Median progression-free survival was 19.1 months and overall survival was 32.1 months. Two patients had a very good partial response three months post treatment. Half the patients were treated at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center and half at the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center. Researchers note that the response rate was better than would be expected for a standard autologous stem cell transplant. In addition, patients did not experience side effects which have been associated with another type of genetically engineered T-cells (chimeric antigen receptors, or CARS) used to treat other cancers.

The study was originally developed by Carl H. June, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center, and Dr. Rapoport, who have been research collaborators for 18 years.

"Multiple myeloma is a treatable but largely incurable cancer. This study reveals the promise that immunotherapy with genetically engineered T-cells holds for boosting the body's ability to attack the cancer and provide patients with better treatments and control of their disease," says E. Albert Reece, MD., PhD, MBA, vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland and the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor and dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "This trial is also an excellent example of significant scientific advances that result from collaborations between academic medical institutions and private industry."

Source:

University of Maryland Medical Center

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 18:10

Sábado, 04.07.15

gene mutation linked to anaplastic oligodendroglioma

Scientists identify gene mutation linked to anaplastic oligodendroglioma

Published on June 12, 2015 at 9:23 AM · 

Scientists have identified a gene mutation linked to the development of an aggressive form of brain cancer.

Researchers found that errors in a gene known as TCF12 - which plays a key role in the formation of the embryonic brain are associated with more aggressive forms of a disease called anaplastic oligodendroglioma.

The new research is the largest ever genetic study of oligodendrogliomas, and provides important insights into their causes - and how they might be treated.

Oligodendrogliomas are fast-growing cancers that account for around 5-10 per cent of all tumours of the brain and central nervous system, and typically have a very poor prognosis.

Researchers at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, in collaboration with laboratories in France and Canada, compared the genetic sequence of 134 of these brain tumours with the DNA of healthy cells.

The study was largely funded by Investissements d'avenir and Génome Québec, with support from Cancer Research UK, and was published in the journal Nature Communications.

Researchers identified mutations in the TCF12 gene in 7.5 per cent of anaplastic oligodendrogliomas. They found that this subset of cancers grew more rapidly, and in other ways seemed more aggressive, than those where the gene was intact.

TCF12 is the genetic code for a protein that binds to DNA and controls the activity of other genes. The researchers found that mutations in TCF12 rendered the protein less able to bind to DNA, and this in turn led to a reduction in activity of other key genes - including one already associated with cancer spread, known as CHD1.

The researchers initially read the DNA sequence of 51 tumours and went on to look for TCF12 mutations in an additional group of 83.

The researchers also discovered errors in the gene IDH1 in 78 per cent of the tumours, confirming the findings of an initial scan of the data.

Finding out more about what genetic faults cause anaplastic oligodendrogliomas will allow scientists and clinicians to develop new personalised therapies that target a range of the mutations driving the disease.

Professor Richard Houlston, Professor of Molecular and Population Genetics at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, said:

"Our in-depth study has set out many of the genetic defects that cause this rare but highly aggressive form of brain cancer - including identifying a gene mutation that appears in particularly fast-growing forms.

"Anaplastic oligodendrogliomas are difficult to remove by surgery and don't respond well to other forms of treatment. We hope this new information might be used to discover new targeted therapies, offering patients a better chance at survival from this aggressive cancer."

Source:

Institute of Cancer Research

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 11:46

Sábado, 04.07.15

new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Scientists identify new protein that affects growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain

Published on July 1, 2015 at 7:19 AM 

Scientists from the University of Leeds and The Institute of Cancer Research, London, have discovered a new protein which triggers the growth of blood vessels in breast cancer tumours which have spread to the brain, a common location which breast cancer can spread to.

Dr Georgia Mavria's team in the School of Medicine at Leeds found that by withholding the DOCK4 protein in mouse models, a particular part of the blood vessel did not form as quickly, meaning tumours grew at a slower rate.

Dr Mavria said: "We want to understand how these tumours form and grow, but we still need to do more research to stop these tumours growing altogether.

"The finding gives an important indicator of how the protein affects the growth of secondary breast tumours in the brain. The discovery could also enable experts to predict which patients might be at risk of their breast cancer spreading, and develop drugs to prevent the growth of secondary tumours."

Working with Professor Chris Marshall, Professor of Cell Biology at The Institute of Cancer Research, London and the late Dr Tony Pawson at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Toronto, researchers found that a complex of two related proteins, DOCK4 and DOCK9, is critical in the formation of the lumen, the interior space of a vessel through which blood flows.

By impeding the speed at which the lumen forms, tumours are not fed as effectively by blood vessels.

Normally, when breast cancer spreads to other parts of the body, it forces new blood vessels to form to supply it with nutrients and oxygen to help it to grow, resulting in tumours that are very difficult to treat.

Professor Marshall said: "Our study reveals new insights into how the complex process of forming blood vessels is controlled. This knowledge could lead to new approaches to preventing the blood supply to tumours and metastases. If we can find new ways to reduce the blood supply to tumours, we might be able to find new ways to slow cancer growth in future."

The research, which has been published in Nature Communications, was funded by Breast Cancer Now, Yorkshire Cancer Research and Cancer Research UK.

Dr Matthew Lam, Senior Research Communications Officer at Breast Cancer Now, said: "These findings could one day help us better identify and treat patients that might be at risk of their breast cancer spreading to the brain, a particularly common site for metastasis.

"12,000 women have their lives cut short by breast cancer in the UK each year. An understanding of what is happening on a molecular level - such as the role played by DOCK proteins - will be essential if we are to find ways to prevent secondary tumours and finally stop women dying from the disease."

Kathryn Scott, Head of Research and Innovation at Yorkshire Cancer Research, said: "Tumours need blood vessels to grow, but these blood vessels could be the cancer's weakest link because it is believed that they are less able to become resistant to drugs than the cancer cells themselves. Targeting drugs to the blood vessels that are serving the tumour rather than the tumour itself is an exciting new area of research and we are supporting a number of projects in Yorkshire which are investigating this approach."

Dr Aine McCarthy, Science Information Officer at Cancer Research UK, said: "This research shows for the first time that a molecule called DOCK4 is a key player in tumour blood vessel development and blocking it could slow tumour growth by starving the cancer cells. But the study was carried out in mice, so more research is needed to see if drugs can be developed that target the molecule and whether this approach would be safe and effective in people with cancer."

Source:

University of Leeds

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 11:34

Sábado, 04.07.15

Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

 

Nanoparticles packed with chemotherapy drug and coated with chitosan target cancer stem-like cells

Published on July 1, 2015 at 7:35 AM ·

Nanoparticles packed with a clinically used chemotherapy drug and coated with an oligosaccharide derived from the carapace of crustaceans might effectively target and kill cancer stem-like cells, according to a recent study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James). Cancer stem-like cells have characteristics of stem cells and are present in very low numbers in tumors. They are highly resistant to chemotherapy and radiation and are believed to play an important role in tumor recurrence. This laboratory and animal study showed that nanoparticles coated with the oligosaccharide called chitosan and encapsulating the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin can target and kill cancer stem-like cells six times more effectively than free doxorubicin.

"Our findings indicate that this nanoparticle delivery system increases the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin with no evidence of systemic toxic side effects in our animal model," says principal investigator Xiaoming (Shawn) He, PhD, associate professor of Biomedical Engineering and a member of the OSUCCC - James Translational Therapeutics Program.

"We believe that chitosan-decorated nanoparticles could also encapsulate other types of chemotherapy and be used to treat many types of cancer."

This study showed that chitosan binds with a receptor on cancer stem-like cells called CD44, enabling the nanoparticles to target the malignant stem-like cells in a tumor.

The nanoparticles were engineered to shrink, break open, and release the anticancer drug under the acidic conditions of the tumor microenvironment and in tumor-cell endosomes and lysosomes, which cells use to digest nutrients acquired from their microenvironment.

He and his colleagues conducted the study using models called 3D mammary tumor spheroids (i.e., mammospheres) and an animal model of human breast cancer.

The study also found that although the drug-carrying nanoparticles could bind to the variant CD44 receptors on cancerous mammosphere cells, they did not bind well to the CD44 receptors that were overexpressed on noncancerous stem cells.

Source:

Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 11:21

Quinta-feira, 25.06.15

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Blood, Blood Cancer, Blood Disorder, Bone, Bone Marrow, Cancer, Cardiology, Cell, DNA, Education, Gene, Genetic, Genetics, Hematology, Hospital, Leukemia, Neurology, Neurosurgery, Oncology, Pediatrics, Platelets, Thrombocytop

Researchers track down key gene mutation responsible for causing acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Published on June 18, 2015 at 8:52 AM ·

After collecting data on a leukemia-affected family for nearly a decade, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit Medical Center (DMC), Hematologist and Wayne State University School of Medicine Professor of Pediatrics Madhvi Rajpurkar, M.D., joined an international team of genetic researchers in an effort to track down a mutation partly responsible for causing the disease. Their findings, recently published in one of the world's leading science journals, have "major implications" for better understanding the genetic basis of several types of cancer, including leukemia.

Says Children's Hospital of Michigan Hematology/Oncology Researcher and Wayne State University Assistant Professor of Pediatrics Michael Callaghan, M.D., an investigator who co-authored the recently published study in Nature Genetics: "This is a very exciting new finding in cancer research - and I think a lot of the credit has to go to Dr. Rajpurkar for identifying the family (with the genetic mutation). This is a great example of how an astute clinician can help accomplish a breakthrough in research by paying careful attention to patients and then thinking long and hard about what she is seeing in the treatment room."

Two medical researchers from the Children's Hospital of Michigan and the Wayne State University School of Medicine have published the results of a nearly 10-year investigation that identified a key gene mutation that can trigger acute lymphoblastic leukemia, or ALL, and several other types of cancer.

Recently published in Nature Genetics, the findings assembled by the Children's Hospital of Michigan and Wayne State University School of Medicine duo and a team of international investigators have for the first time pinpointed a mutation that allows a lymphoblastic leukemia "precursor" to set the biochemical stage for the blood disorder.

ALL is a blood cancer that attacks an early version of white blood cells manufactured in bone marrow. Investigators have long suspected that it is caused in part by a mutation in a gene that is supposed to "turn off" excessive blood-cell growth. When the mutation suppresses the controlling mechanism that regulates the runaway growth, leukemia is often the result.

The study, "Germline mutations in ETV6 are associated with thrombocytopenia, red cell macrocytosis and predisposition to lymphoblastic leukemia," began nearly a decade ago when Dr. Rajpurkar treated a child at the Children's Hospital of Michigan for low blood platelets, known medically as "congenital thrombocytopenia." When both the child and an aunt later developed ALL - even as several other family members were diagnosed with thrombocytopenia - Dr. Rajpurkar began to suspect that there might be a genetic mutation at work in the family.

What followed was a 10-year journey through the labyrinth of the Human Genome, as the researchers worked with a growing number of genetic investigators to isolate and identify the mutation in a gene (ETV6) that regulates growth rates in bone marrow.

A key breakthrough in the quest for the genetic culprit took place when a nationally recognized expert in gene mutation - University of Colorado physician-researcher Jorge DiPaola, M.D. - joined Drs. Rajpurkar and Callaghan, and other investigators from Italy and Canada, in the effort to solve the DNA puzzle by uncovering the flaw in ETV6. The mutation discovery occurred in a core facility where the gene-sequencing took place.

While noting that "our findings underscore a key role for ETV6 in platelet formation and leukemia predisposition," the study's authors concluded that the mutation occurs through "aberrant cellular localization" of the gene, which can result in "decreased transcriptional repression" during white blood cell formation.

"What we think that means," Dr. Callaghan said, "is that ETV6's job is to 'turn off' growth, but when you have this mutation, it can't turn it off because it's in the wrong place. It's usually supposed to sit on the DNA and keep things (including cancer) from getting made, but when you have this mutation, instead of sitting on the DNA it's sitting in a different part of the cell.... And that predisposes you to getting a (blood) cancer."

Dr. Rajpurkar, who is also the division chief of Hematology at the Children's Hospital of Michigan and an associate professor of Pediatrics at the Wayne State University School of Medicine, said she was "greatly pleased" that her decade of treating the Detroit family with the mutation eventually led to the breakthrough. "I told them that I didn't know what the family had," she said, "but that I would do my best to find out. Sometimes one has to accept uncertainty in the field of medicine, but (persistence in clinical research) pays off!"

The Children's Hospital of Michigan Pediatrician-in-Chief and chair of the Wayne State University School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics Steven E. Lipshultz, M.D., said the breakthrough was "hugely important" because it resulted in "a new association (between a genetic mutation and leukemia) that can now be scanned for.

"Because of this finding," he added, "families will eventually be counseled regarding their risk for some kinds of cancer and targeted interventions will be devised and tested."

Dr. Lipshultz also noted that the new findings in "what many physicians and researchers regard as the leading journal in the world on the molecular genetic basis of human disease" also provide "an exciting and extremely encouraging example of how research that takes place in the clinical setting can greatly improve care for patients.

"Our goal at the Children's Hospital of Michigan is to do everything we can to help achieve better outcomes for the patients we serve. This latest publication by two CHM physician-researchers and their colleagues underlines the vitally important links between treatment and research, and to see them demonstrated so compellingly inNature Genetics is quite thrilling for all of us who spend our days trying to help kids at the Children's Hospital of Michigan!"

Source:

Wayne State University - Office of the Vice President for Research

Autoria e outros dados (tags, etc)

por cyto às 11:49


Mais sobre mim

foto do autor


Subscrever por e-mail

A subscrição é anónima e gera, no máximo, um e-mail por dia.

Pesquisar

Pesquisar no Blog  

calendário

Fevereiro 2016

D S T Q Q S S
123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829